Credits : Abc3340

Credits : Abc3340

 

Birmingham-based r360 Consulting has entered into a three-year agreement with the City of Northport.

According to the firm, Northport will pay r360 $25,000 per year to collect economic data and lure retailers to the city.

The consulting firm plans to use “mobile mapping”, which is a popular tool in the retail industry. The technology tracks the locations of shopper’s phones.

“It allows us to know where the mobile device is during the evening, during the day and where it was two hours prior to visiting a specific [retail] location,” said r360 CEO Chuck Branch.

Branch said r360 receives the mobile information from UberRetail, a company that provides location data for retail site selection.

“We use their software solutions and their data collection to create a polygon area around a specific retailer, and look at the location points that are both animized and aggregated, to identify that daytime, nighttime, and two-hour time frame,” Branch explained.

According to Branch, the mobile data his office receives does not include personal information.

“I can’t tell you if it’s Jane Doe, John Doe. I can’t tell you their cell phone number,” the CEO added.

ABC 33/40 News spoke with several Northport shoppers who were surprised mobile mapping will used in their city.

“I understand they’re coming from a business perspective to build up the city, but it is a bit scary,” Lisa Melems said.

“I don’t really have a problem with it. It’s still kind of invasive, because you don’t want everybody knowing everywhere you go,” Stephanie Sullivan told ABC 33/40 News.

According to Matthew Hudnall at The University of Alabama’s Center for Advanced Public Safety, there are two ways cell phones are mapped. One is through “location services” under your phone’s privacy settings.

“So that is actually apps on a person’s cell phone where people allow the app manufacturer to track their location,” Hudnall said.

The other way retailers track your location is through your phone’s Bluetooth.

“..by Bluetooth beacons that are deployed in stores. These Bluetooth beacons track the Bluetooth transmissions on an individual’s cell phone if they have Bluetooth enabled on their phone,” Hudnall explained.

The CEO of r360 will soon share mobile mapping information to area developers and tenant reps looking for retail opportunities in the City of Northport.

“We’re excited to work with the City of Northport. We believe there are some opportunities and we’re looking forward to getting started,” Branch said.

Credits : Techrepublic

 

Mobile apps are like living organisms: they require care and feeding in the form of updates to keep them relevant and useful. However, the process can be tricky at times, depending on the type of app, the features it offers, the security details involved and the information the app processes or stores.

In my last article I wrote about ways to build reactive mobile apps which focused on tips for designing apps which react to user needs and actions. As a follow-up to this piece, now let’s talk about how to keep those apps updated for the maximum benefit for your users.

I chatted with Erez Rusovsky at Rollout, a company which provides a native iOS solution that helps organizations fix bugs and push live updates on the fly to deployed applications, as well as ensure developers are able to retain the control of their apps after they deploy them to the App Store.

“The mobile app market has become a $51 billion industry and 79% of U.S. companies say mobile apps are a factor in their success,” said Rusovsky. “Yet the distribution model for mobile apps is completely out of the control of the creator once in the hands of the user. As more companies rely on mobile as a critical business driver, it is not only frustrating but costly if your app experiences a bug or hiccup and waiting hours, let alone days, this can bleed revenue or customer trust from your business.”

Web and SaaS solutions can continuously deliver and deploy apps with plenty of open-source and commercial solutions. Mobility doesn’t offer the same diversity. Only widespread apps such as Facebook and Airbnb have their own in-house deployment solutions. However, we’re seeing increased options for mobile development solutions now; third party tools can allow companies to make remote changes without releasing new versions. Examples include mobile testing solutions like Optimizely, which allows companies to tweak the user interface remotely, and remote configuration solutions such as Firebase Config which can change app configurations remotely. Another example would be marketing automation solutions such as AppBoy which allow adding in-app messages on the fly.

Given these challenges, here are some tips on how to formulate a reliable workflow for your mobile app update process. I devised the first four based upon my experience as a system administrator, the next six are Rusovsky’s recommendations from a software development perspective.

Mobile apps are like living organisms: they require care and feeding in the form of updates to keep them relevant and useful. However, the process can be tricky at times, depending on the type of app, the features it offers, the security details involved and the information the app processes or stores.

In my last article I wrote about ways to build reactive mobile apps which focused on tips for designing apps which react to user needs and actions. As a follow-up to this piece, now let’s talk about how to keep those apps updated for the maximum benefit for your users.

I chatted with Erez Rusovsky at Rollout, a company which provides a native iOS solution that helps organizations fix bugs and push live updates on the fly to deployed applications, as well as ensure developers are able to retain the control of their apps after they deploy them to the App Store.

“The mobile app market has become a $51 billion industry and 79% of U.S. companies say mobile apps are a factor in their success,” said Rusovsky. “Yet the distribution model for mobile apps is completely out of the control of the creator once in the hands of the user. As more companies rely on mobile as a critical business driver, it is not only frustrating but costly if your app experiences a bug or hiccup and waiting hours, let alone days, this can bleed revenue or customer trust from your business.”

Web and SaaS solutions can continuously deliver and deploy apps with plenty of open-source and commercial solutions. Mobility doesn’t offer the same diversity. Only widespread apps such as Facebook and Airbnb have their own in-house deployment solutions. However, we’re seeing increased options for mobile development solutions now; third party tools can allow companies to make remote changes without releasing new versions. Examples include mobile testing solutions like Optimizely, which allows companies to tweak the user interface remotely, and remote configuration solutions such as Firebase Config which can change app configurations remotely. Another example would be marketing automation solutions such as AppBoy which allow adding in-app messages on the fly.

Given these challenges, here are some tips on how to formulate a reliable workflow for your mobile app update process. I devised the first four based upon my experience as a system administrator, the next six are Rusovsky’s recommendations from a software development perspective.

1. Have a dedicated app update release schedule

Releasing updates in a haphazard or random fashion is a recipe for disaster. Updating an app twice in one month then not at all for six months looks unprofessional and sloppy. Decide how many feature revisions or additions should trigger an update – whether 2, 5 or more, and devise a standard schedule such as releasing updates on a monthly or quarterly basis.

Security-related updates may necessitate more frequent or “one-off” releases. It’s more important to push out a code change which protects confidential data than adding new fonts or a new icon, so ensure users understand the difference between security fixes and standard app revisions – and the urgency of installing the former as soon as possible.

2. Develop a deeper understanding of issues and areas of improvement

To get the best analysis of what issues your app faces and where it needs to be toned, utilize functions such as screen recording, smarter bug diagnostics with the ability to examine error logs on the fly, analytics of app usage and crash reporting functionality. You need a mechanism to review where the pain points lie as well as the high-traffic areas within your app.

3. Devise a standard method of app update notifications

Formulate a plan for notifying users of app updates and providing them with options; is it an alert within the app, an e-mail announcement, a text message or some other mechanism? Avoid the possibility of repetitive or unwanted alerts, but make sure to include a list of some of the advantages the update entails; new features or options, better performance or stability, etc. Make sure to include contact information for support if needed to help users navigate problems with app updates.

4. Monitor app update statistics and feedback

Check to see how rapidly users are updating your mobile app and revise the above steps if needed based upon results. Are security updates not being applied as quickly as they should? Do you need to be more aggressive (or less so) with your announcements? Is user feedback reporting too many problems, or an overly cumbersome update cadence? See what, if anything, needs to change to improve the process.

Dynamic analytics can also be helpful. Some of the analytics platforms today (such as Mixpanel) allow you to dynamically change/add analytics allowing you to gain more flexibility and avoid another release just to fix/change a minor issue.

5. Conduct thorough app testing when preparing updates

You should conduct internal QA, beta testing and distribution testing to ensure successful delivery of the app updates on an internal basis, with app users familiar with the code and functions who can spot potential issues or complications. Ensure you have the right toolset to make beta testing more efficient and automated.

6. Take advantage of remote configuration

With this model the data in your app is no longer hard-coded and you can use remote configuration components to set it up or change it depending on user need and options. For instance, altering the welcome message, controlling how many times an ad is being presented (if at all), or implementing parameter values that affect the app such as game complexity level, the color of the screen, etc.

7. Deploy new features without immediate activation

Don’t hard code a feature activation into the updated app (meaning this change does not take immediate effect until you’re ready). Then you can decide when to activate the feature remotely and to whom, so you can now release a new version and test new features gradually. Furthermore, you can roll back a misbehaving feature with minimal impact.

8. Use feature flagging

Feature flagging means you remotely decide or test who gets what experience; users may have different needs or preferences and this allows a focus on particular features based on who may gain the most benefit. For instance, a sales executive can utilize a sales-related component of an app, or a marketing analyst can focus on the social media aspect to spread awareness of a product.

9. Identify how to work with bugs/issues in production

Decide how to engage in damage control and fix bugs remotely, whether through new app versions or remote configuration changes. This is essentially what Rollout does; it allows you to deploy a hotfix / patch the app remotely to help contain issues and notify users about quality issues, and you can deploy a change without a version release.

10. Work with Native vs Hybrid or JavaScript based solutions

Native language solutions are straightforward. Hybrid based solutions (which usually use both JavaScript and a native language) can update the JavaScript code from the backend without a new app version release, adding some agility. Some companies are willing to pay the price of decreased app performance to gain the agility of javascript updates.

React Native by Facebook takes a different approach as a hybrid solution that does allow for JavaScript updates (which means remote code update) and it has almost no performance penalties when compared to a native language app. Microsoft also has a solution called CodePush to streamline the process of JavaScript remote updates.

Credits : Timesofindia.indiatimes

Credits : Timesofindia.indiatimes

 

The first part of ‘Baahubali’ tasted stupendous success and ahead of the release of the second installment, a game based on the magnum opus is in development.

Mark Skaggs, who is the creator of ‘FarmVille’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’ games is in talks with director SS Rajamouli.

 “Mark Skaggs (from Moonfrog Labs) creator of FarmVille and Lord of the Rings games (among others) discussing the creation of Baahubali mobile game with SS Rajamouli.”
 “Exciting stuff coming your way… Stay tuned!” a post on the official page of “Baahaubalui” read. ‘Baahubali: The Beginning’ released in 2015 and its starred Prabhas, Rana Daggubati, Anushka Shetty and Tamannaah.

 

Credits : Iamwire

Credits : Iamwire

 

When it comes to mobile app development, every step of the process is as vital as the next. Cutting corners anywhere can cost the final product stability and user interest. As mobile app developers, it is important to maintain an understanding of each step of the mobile app development lifecycle. This will provide you with the ability to maintain focus on the task at hand while not missing key aspects of the development process.

Below we list the mobile app development lifecycle for your use while coding and developing your apps. Whether you are developing the app yourself or are hiring a mobile application development company to do it for you, this will help you make a schedule.

Phase 1: Envision

Prior to any wireframing or design, a concept for the app must be created. Take the time to envision the purpose of the app and what need will be met when the user interacts with your product. Rushing through this process will undoubtedly impact the quality of your app in the end. Compile a list of all possible mobile app ideas. Brainstorm and research by looking at other successful mobile apps. Often looking at what other companies have done inspires an idea for an improved product. Begin filtering out lower quality ideas with the desire to end with just one great idea. Complete market research as you focus in on the app you plan to build. Understand the market gaps and what the consumer base is requesting from their products. Do not be surprised if the market research births a new or revised mobile app idea. Be sure to be flexible during this time.

By this point, you will want to have reduced your list of ideas to one. If you have completed the required research and still have two or three, then make a confident choice on one and save the rest for later. The final step in this first stage is to develop a mission plan for the app. Take the time to write out who the app is for, what the app does, and why they need it. This will help your team of mobile app developers navigate the development process, keeping the original idea clear in their minds.

Phase 2: Design

It’s very easy to focus simply on the engineering of the mobile app, but you must think like a user during this stage. It may get the job done, but if it is not user-friendly, the app will struggle to catch on. Keep the UX design crisp and easy to follow. Humans have recently been found to have an attention span of 8 seconds. So if your UX takes more than 8 seconds to understand in any way, then you can make improvements. Also, be sure to fully utilize the features of each operating system. If your target customer base uses Galaxy phones with the split screen feature, then be sure to code that feature into your app. Do not take these features lightly, as they can provide an opportunity to make your app truly great.

Once you have created an acceptable wireframe concept, begin the graphic design step. Take the wireframe and flesh out each page of the app. This is the main aspect of your product that will keep users interested, so do not cut corners on the design. Use tools, such as Adobe Kuler, to create a color palate that is pleasing and sharp to the user.

Phase 3: Test & Stabilization

During this phase, you will be focusing on getting all of the coding bugs out of the app. Call on groups who would use such an app and have them try it out. Ask for their input on the app design, features, and overall usability.

You may be able to add a lot of features to your app, but until consumers actually put your product to full use you will not truly confirm the validity of the app. Use their feedback to improve your final product into something that will last. During this testing phase you will also want to test the app yourself, specifically attempting to make it crash. This is in order to find the inevitable kinks in your coding and fix any issues.

Look for the issues. Use every feature in as many ways as possible with the sole purpose of finding the bugs. If you don’t find them, then your users will. It’s better that the development team finds the issues first.

Phase 4: Product Release

This is the phase of the process where the marketing team enters the picture. They must know as well as you how the app operates and what the desired customer base may be. The product must also be optimized for the app platform in mind. Are you focused on mainstream options, such as the Apple App Store or Google Play? Or is the better option the Amazon App Store? Know your target market and upload appropriately.

Phase 5: Update & Maintain

The final phase takes phases 2 through 4 and puts them on repeat. It is vital to the longevity of your app that you maintain constant monitoring of its appearance and functionality.

No matter how many bugs you found during the initial Test & Stabilization phase, your users will find more bugs. You need to be able to respond to the coding issues quickly and efficiently in order to maintain a loyal consumer base. How many times have your favorite apps changed their look? Sometimes the design of apps changes in subtle ways, and sometimes the change makes it feel like a brand new app. Either way, updates are often necessary to keep the app feeling fresh and up to date. Continue to design and redesign the app; down to the wireframing level.

Also, do not let your updates go unnoticed. With each update be sure to explain clearly how the app has been improved and why. This not only shows the user base that there is active improvement being completed on the app, but that the errors experienced are being noticed by the development team.

 

Credits : Itnewsafrica

Credits : Itnewsafrica

In CNN Money’s 2017 job rankings, mobile app developers came out on top, beating in-vogue, emergent fields like data science, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence, as well as literally every other profession from other industries.

And it’s certainly not the only survey that has pegged mobile app development as one of the world’s hottest and most highly-paid skills.

But in countries like South Africa, where innovation is easily stifled due to a severe shortage in technical skills, just where will we find all of the mobile developers needed to build the next-generation applications that will power our businesses?

The wrong debate?

In fact, the need for development skills across different native mobile operating systems may be somewhat over-hyped, notes Craig Terblanche, Regional Director of OutSystems SA. “When PCs first emerged, people flocked to acquire core operating system development skills; but with the introduction of the web browser the demand for these skills quickly waned,” he explains.

“Fast-forward a couple of decades, and the latest-generation low-code digital platforms may change the market for native mobile development in a similar way to the web browser, through technologies like Javascript that run in the browser .”

Low-code platforms emphasise the idea or vision of an application, and its relevance to solving a business or a customer challenge, over the technical development of the app itself. They allow individuals to get to a Minimum Valuable Product (MVP) quickly, free from constraints like skills scarcity, financial resources, or layers of governance and approvals.

For those that do want to pursue the route of deep technical skills in the mobile development arena, low-code platforms can be a convenient way to get into the field, and start delivering practical value to employers or clients immediately. “We’ve seen people start building low-code apps from all kinds of backgrounds – Business Analysts, classic BCom graduates, or those that are more technically-minded in other development fields,” adds Terblanche.

“Re-tooling oneself towards low-code development is actually very simple for those with a good understanding of system fundamentals, structuring data, mapping processes, defining business logic and understanding user behaviour.”

Major trends for 2017

Many analysts and industry experts point to inward-facing, employee apps as one of the next great frontiers for digital migration, as organisations realise that changing their outward digital appearance needs to be supported by true digitisation from within.

Forrester, for example, predicts that enterprises like The Home Depot and Unilever will spend four times more on digitising their operations, compared with the amount they’ve spent on digitally transforming their customers’ experiences.

As this concept of a ‘company app suite’ for staff gains momentum, addressing this demand seems unlikely if we rely on expensive, specialised native developers. A more realistic option is for non-technical business teams to be empowered with the tools to develop new solutions, unlock value from legacy architecture, and ultimately solve their challenges.

Perhaps the second major trend to dominate the mobile landscape in 2017 will be the need for applications to leverage data from an explosion of new sources. As we start truly integrating Artificial Intelligence, connected devices (the Internet of Things), and social business tools into our apps, the complexity escalates wildly.

Taking advantage of these new trends entails managing an exponential number of new data-points – which can become extremely costly with a fragmented, native development approach where applications are re-written from scratch across 3 or 4 different operating systems.

Ultimately, there’s no doubt that digital skills should feature on every ‘hottest jobs’ list, but honing in on native mobile development may be something of a blinkered approach.

The digital skills of the future should be far broader than this – encompassing the likes of user-experience, lean startup principles, pitching and lobbying for support, and creative problem solving, among others.

By Craig Terblanche

Credits : Business2community

Credits : Business2community

 

The eye-catching surge in the smartphone users has encouraged entrepreneurs to take the ‘BIG’ step of shifting from desktop to mobile devices. Considered as one of the most flourishing business areas, enterprise mobile app development has immensely revolutionized the way business tasks are executed. Since the launch of this new programming language, Swift app development has been a hot topic among many top enterprises. Leading mobile application development companies believe that this is the right time to turn to a fully featured and more approachable coding language for iOS app development. With app development in Swift, businesses have identified a huge scope in developing enterprise applications, endowed with multiple functionalities that enhance the user experience, satisfy customer needs and generate maximum revenue. We have seen the ascent of certain progressive innovations in recent years, similar to the ones like IoT, Cloud Computing and Big Data bringing very fast changes all through the industry, similarly like app development in Swift.

Since the launch of this new programming language, app development in Swift has always been in the middle of all discussions among enterprises. It has a higher quality code, is easier to maintain and has a very good performance level. After its launch, Apple’s new language has the potential to become the effective coding language for creating immersive, responsive, consumer-facing enterprise applications.

The app team at LinkedIn has chosen to go with Swift for the SlideShare app development because its syntax is very simple, English-like and very expressive. According to them, Swift’s functional programming features and focus on safety was the driving force, for the switch. Recently, app development in Swift has become the talk of the times, being a good enterprise choice for apps like Lyft, LinkedIn, Getty Images and American Airlines. The early adopters of Apple’s new language end-to-end approach are already seeing the value it brings to their business.

The open source nature of Swift has made it one of the most preferred app programming languages among iOS app developers who can’t afford to invest in the tool for building stunning enterprise apps. App development in Apple’s new language provides excellent opportunities for building apps easily and quickly. Other hot topic related to enterprise app development in Swift includes – open source libraries and flexibility to create contextual apps on latest iOS versions. Another trend introduced in app development in Swift would be the gradual shift of enterprise apps on the cloud architecture. This move by enterprises has encouraged iOS app developers to indulge in the development of different types of apps for payment processing, content management, CRM, automated billing systems, messaging system and more.

Why will you need Swift? Every business that needs to develop more interactive and faster mobile application on the iOS platform must look for app development in Swift. iOS Swift development would help to bring sensible functional elements into play, reducing the amount of time and overhead for your business operations. Today’s iOS app developers are keeping pace with the latest transitions in the language and utilizing this framework to benefit their global clients. App developers are familiar with the resilient and concise Swift code and follow the best practices of app development in Swift – to create a wide range of apps. The new language is easily understandable and its syntax is very similar to English. Swift moving to the Cloud extends its value globally. Developing Swift apps in the cloud should be simple and fast.

Swift saves enterprise money as they are compiled codes. With an app written in PHP, the server has to compile the code on the fly, which requires computing resources every time. That means less hardware, less money, more safety and more scalability. Over the past seven years, App Sore has paid over $30 billion to iOS app developers. It holds the record of app download at over 100 million, and currently averaging 850 downloads per second. 83% of the iOS users have the latest version as opposed to only 12% of the Android users. Tim Cook repeatedly emphasized enterprise foundations like privacy, security, and trust.

iOS8 was a huge release for the enterprise that appears to have paid off. According to Apple, 98% of Fortune 500 companies have built one or more iOS apps since iOS8 was released.

Apple CEO Cook Tim said – After Swift’s release as an open source project, more than 100,000 apps have integrated Swift code and it has become the number one language project on GitHub. He also said that is so easy to learn and it has the potential to bring many more people into coding.

Key benefits of Swift in Enterprise App Development:
Apart from helping in building secure and robust enterprise app, Swift makes enterprise app development dynamic in the following three ways.

  • Multi-faceted language: It is considered to be a multifaceted programming language that allows iOS app developers to build all types of apps from, including commonly used enterprise apps, and also advanced low-power Apple Watch apps.
  • Open source for enterprise app development: This is a big move by Apple. Before Apple’s new language, Microsoft.NET was the most used open-source language in the enterprise environment. Open sourcing of core libraries enables developers to develop efficient contextual enterprise apps on the latest version of iOS giving rise to streamlined business processes.
  • Cut down on initial app size with Dynamic Libraries: On most occasions, enterprise apps take more time to load. App development in Swift uses dynamic libraries which are directly uploaded to the memory, cutting down on the initial size of the app, ultimately increasing the app performance.

Objective-C is the past and Swift is the future of enterprise app development. The app developed in Swift – truly has lived up to the name, by being fast, of a better quality and offering high performance. With a strong community support, it is a modern day programming language of iOS development. It has proved to be a smarter programming language, one that can create a more direct and meaningful connection between iOS app developers and end users. The new programming language is becoming more popular and, in time may find a home on corporate servers. The possibility of expanding it to the server side made it the most-loved programming language by iOS app developers. Swift on the cloud is radically simplifying the developer experience, and organizations of all sizes can benefit from this accelerated path to productivity. Successful app development in Swift– has made it a preferred language for enterprise use, and it is exciting to know that more and more companies are starting to realize the benefits of this new programming language. There is a massive ecosystem growing around Swift, and by putting the right tools in the hands of iOS app developers, it is assisting enterprises to accelerate their path to productivity. Productivity benefits of the new language do not only come from within the code – a better app with less code – it also comes from development teams enjoying what they do. Hence, Swift, no doubt is a game changer for enterprises.
Read more at http://www.business2community.com/mobile-apps/enterprises-prefer-app-development-swift-01770374#wgjClFGhRc321K8h.99

Credits : Dazeinfo

Credits : Dazeinfo

 

If you’re looking to build a career as an App developer in India, now is a great time. According to a recent study by Hyperlink Infosystem, the average cost to develop a mobile app in India, either on Android or iOS platforms, is almost ten times cheaper than in the United States.

These findings also come as great news for app publishing businesses who may now start looking at the Indian subcontinent for all their app developments. The vast cost savings associated with outsourcing to developers in India has created a thriving environment at this moment for app developers, who are keen, savvy, and skilled.

In 2016, India overtook the US to become the world’s largest country in terms of demands for mobile development courses, Google India said. In the last two years, India saw a whopping 200% YoY growth in search queries for the mobile development courses. The tech start-up boom still unfazed, there have also been companies such as Plobal Apps, providing small and medium-sized businesses with their own powerful apps, at close to one-tenth the actual costs. Further, the technology market in India is a star performer, attracting top tech companies from across the globe, and also providing a very lucrative field for entrepreneurial tech ventures. Factoring in that, India is now a rapidly developing nation moving towards a digital sphere. Hence, the app development space naturally sees a lot of scope for growth.

What are the chief factors driving this demand and growth trajectory in the Indian app development space?

  1. The expanding app ecosystem itself.

The global mobile app store gross revenue is expected to reach USD 102.5 billion in 2020, almost double of what it is now. Emerging markets such as India, Brazil will be driving much of APAC’s staggering growth in 2020. These markets will account for 76% of global app store downloads and 49% of global mobile app store revenue.

  1. The promising smartphone market.

As per findings from market research firm Counterpoint Research, in the third quarter of 2016, the smartphone shipments in India grew 18% more than the global smartphone market, in India.

  1. India’s young, energetic, and tech-savvy demographics.

The number of app developers in India is predicted to reach close to four million by the next year. This would make it the largest developers’ community in the world. As such, the steep growth in demand for apps has provided a very conducive environment for app developer enthusiasts, who no longer see app development as a menial career choice.

App development in India is so much cheaper for various contributing reasons. Right from the abundant availability of technologically skilled human capital, to the rising number of startups and small app development enterprises that offer their services at competing prices. However, app development may cost much lesser in India chiefly because of the amount of time spent on developing the app, and the infrastructure in place. Another key feature driving the low cost is that app entrepreneurs continuously look to lower their costs while still ensuring the quality of their service.

In its findings, Hyperlink InfoSystem provides an overview of the costs associated with the development of Apps in the Indian App market. While it is beyond argument that cost is one of the most critical aspects that businesses consider, the study proceeds to suggest that businesses would still invest in it if they find it worthy.

The elements that make up the gross cost of an app defines how expensive or cheap it is to make. Going by convention, the elements such as the app idea, the app’s functional layout followed by design, and finally the app development stage, make up the app development process. The app development stage is closely followed by the app’s testing, debugging, and deployment – all of which contribute to the cost break up of an app.

Credits : Exchangewire

Credits : Exchangewire

 

ExchangeWire Research’s weekly roundup brings you up-to-date research findings from around the world, with additional insight provided by Rebecca Muir, head of research and analysis, ExchangeWire. In this week’s edition: Global development of VR; Longer content migrating rapidly to mobile; Ad fraud in mobile apps; and Tech less important to TMT companies.

Global development of VR

Brands and advertisers that utilise VR can tap into higher consumer engagement and attention rates, and are also seen as more innovative, finds research by YuMe. Nearly two-thirds of respondents (63%) have tried an immersive technology, and feel it’s the “next big thing”, while 86% have heard of VR.

VR is considered the most advanced immersive technology. Six in every ten respondents (60%) feel the VR helps create engaging experiences, compared to 53% for 360-degree video. Similarly, 51% feel brands that use VR are innovative, compared to 45% for 360-degree video.

The survey also finds that customers who have used immersive technology firsthand, have a better opinion of it that those who have not. More than half (51%) of respondents who have used an immersive technology are more likely to engage with an ad if it was in 360-degree video, compared to 36% of total respondents. Nearly two-thirds (60%) of those who have used immersive technology also feel brands utilising VR create a positive view of them, compared to 43% of total respondents.

Longer content migrating rapidly to mobile

There were more video views on mobile devices in Q3 than on any other device, according to Ooyala’s Q3 2016 Global Video Index. The research also found changes in the type of video watched on mobile devices.

Longer-form content – video over five minutes in length – accounted for nearly half (48%) of all viewing on smartphones; that’s more than double the 23% seen a year ago. In addition, nearly one-third of all mobile viewing (30%) was of video over 20 minutes in length.

There is an increasingly mobile society in established markets like the United States and Western Europe; growth there will continue as consumers continue to demand it. Amazon’s decision to offer downloadable content for offline viewing – and Netflix’s more recent decision to do the same – are also acting as drivers.

Sports viewing on mobile is also on the up. A year ago, Ireland was the only country in which sports video views topped 50% on mobile devices. Now, Europe sees mobile video views of sports-related content at 54%, higher than the 49% global average.

Ad fraud in mobile apps

More than half of all uncertified apps displayed malicious activity, and even some certified apps were just as toxic, finds a study by Sizmek.

About 9% of mobile apps generating ad traffic were not certified by the app stores. Eight in every ten (80%) of these apps were on Android devices, with 56% of this group proven to be malicious. Half of illegally downloaded iOS apps were proven to be malicious. All told, 52% of all uncertified apps were found to be malicious. Of certified apps, a small fraction (1.5%) engaged in ad fraud.

From approximately 20 billion impressions, 10% of all mobile apps traffic came from apps not certified by the app stores. Three-fifths (60%) of these impressions came from Android devices. Over a third (37%) of this group was proven malicious, with the rest either low quality or not found (and most likely malicious). Two-fifths (40%) of the uncertified traffic came from iOS devices, and 43% of these apps facilitated illegal downloads, while 57% were unstable apps. Both groups were likely largely malicious.

Tech less important to TMT companies

Despite advancements in technology and artificial intelligence in the workplace, 62% of enterprises in the Tech, Media, and Telecoms (TMT) sector are seeking to employ more staff to drive their company forward, Colliers latest research reveals. This demonstrates the ‘human factor’ still plays a critical role in business development.

Technology was viewed as the least important strategic resource by all but one company. Yet most businesses surveyed did expect big change and efficiency improvements through the introduction of new technology in the business and the workplace, especially the development of cloud-based systems.

The consensus among all the companies surveyed was that human resources (HR) remains the most important strategic resource, which is needed to drive business growth over the coming years. Without the ability to tap into pools of technical talent, the business would not be able to grow at the desired rate.

Credits: Indianexpress

Credits: Indianexpress

 

Samsung is not willing to kill off its Galaxy Note series, a brand that it has developed since 2011 just because one of the device in the series was prone to fires, and explosions in some cases. Samsung mobile chief, DJ Koh has confirmed the company will be moving on from the Galaxy Note 7 disaster and will be building the Galaxy Note 8.

“I will bring back a better, safer and very innovative Note 8,” Koh said in an interview with Cnet. He also talked about Samsung’s plan to rebuild its credibility with its customers, which was tainted by many of its Note 7 devices exploding or catching fire – leading to two messy product recalls by the company.

This new development refutes earlier claims that Samsung will be killing off its ‘Note’ brand altogether following the Note 7 debacle. The company and the Note series received a lot of negative attention, and its market value was stripped by 8 per cent (estimated to be $18 billion) following its cancellation of the program. There is no information regarding specs of the Galaxy Note 8 as of yet.

A report by Russian website HiTechMail had suggested that more than 50 per cent of the people in South Korea had developed a negative view of the ‘Note’ brand.

Meanwhile, Samsung is preparing to launch an update to its Galaxy S7 smartphone; with the Galaxy S8 set for a March 29 launch. Galaxy S8 promotional images suggest the phone will be doing away with the physical home button and getting thinner bezels. It is expected to be the first device running Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 835 processor.

Credits : Fabric

Credits : Fabric

 

Twitter’s mobile development platform Fabric has been sold to Google for an undisclosed sum.

Until today’s announcement, Fabric was one advantage Twitter held over Facebook after Zuckerberg’s giant shuttered its own ‘Parse’ platform. Clearly, mobile development platforms under the control of social networks are not meant to be.

Developers who use Fabric can at least feel comforted the platform is not being shuttered and may, in fact, have increased support under Google’s stewardship. Parse, for its part, became open-source and can now be found on GitHub here.

All the features which developers love about Fabric will be retained including Nuance speech recognition, Digits user authentication, Answers analytics, and Crashlytics.

Fabric’s entire team will join Google’s Developer Products Group and work alongside the Firebase team which expanded to become a ‘unified app platform for Android, iOS, and mobile web development’ last year.

“When we met the team at Google we quickly realized that our missions are the same – helping mobile teams build better apps, understand their users, and grow their businesses,” Rich Paret, VP of Engineering at Fabric, wrote in a blog post. “Fabric and Firebase operate mobile platforms with unique strengths in the market today. We’re excited to combine these platforms together to make the best mobile developer platform in the world for app teams.”

The move is sure to damage Twitter’s already dicey relationship with developers who haven’t quite restored their faith in the social network after the company implemented token limits for third-party apps.

With the company reporting losses of more than $100 million in the third quarter of 2016, however, it’s clear Twitter is trimming down where it can to reduce its overheads and services it has to maintain to prevent the microblogging service ending up in the position where it has to sell itself or face demise.