Credits : Fastcompany

The internet is a system that demands more: more engagement, more clicks, more ads, more content, more code, more servers, and more devices. The size of a typical web page has increased exponentially in recent years. Thirty-nine percent of young Americans report they are online “almost constantly.” Today almost 20% of American households contain more than 10 internet-connected devices, which have their own associated energy costs. By 2025, the internet will account for 20% of the energy consumed on the planet.

Last month, Low-Tech Magazine quietly published a completely redesigned site for its technology- and energy-focused journalism that looks radical by comparison. The premise is simple: Less.

Unlike millions of other dynamic sites on the internet today that retrieve each piece of content from a database any time someone visits, Low-Tech’s solar-powered site is simply static documents stored on a single, self-hosted server.

That server is powered by a small photovoltaic array on founder Kris De Decker’s balcony in Barcelona, which keeps the site online when it’s sunny. If it’s cloudy for more than a day or two, Low-Tech goes offline. A battery icon on each article shows how much juice the server has left and the forecast (sunny and 83%, at the moment).

There are no ads or pop-up dialogs, and images are compressed to a bare minimum. The logo is a unicode symbol and the typeface is your browser default, which means your computer doesn’t have to query a server. All in all, the average page size is five times smaller than the old site.It’s a radical departure from the digital design of today, where more videos and dynamic features have made web pages heavier and heavier. But the new site isn’t a Ludditical argument for the return of 1990s-era internet. It’s more like a reminder that our internet has weight–and everyone, from developers and designers to writers and readers–contributes to it.

“We used to [only] be online when we were at a desktop computer with an internet connection,” De Decker says. “But now this limitation is gone, so we’re online from the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep.”

Have you ever thought about how much energy it takes to refresh your Instagram while you’re lying in bed? Be honest. The premise of Low-Tech’s redesign is simple: We should be thinking about it.

The new site is the result of two summers of collaboration with artist Roel Roscam Abbing and designers Marie Otsuka. and Lauren Traugott-Campbell, who received a grant while at RISD to work with De Decker on developing a low-energy platform and content management system for the magazine. Otsuka, now graduated and working as a type designer, wanted the the site to expose its own infrastructure.

“This approach is very specific to Low-Tech, but I do think it’s really important to understand all the parts that go into a website–in addition to the look and feel on the front-end, the infrastructure on the back-end,” she explains. “What the design is aiming to do is show that relationship, and have the infrastructure of the website also be part of the content of the website.”

For instance, they decided to compress every image on the site with dithering, a long-outdated form of compression that was popular in the 1990s:

Dithering makes images 10 times less resource-intensive–but that’s not the only reason they chose it. When the magazine relaunched, commenters pointed out that newer types of image compression could’ve achieved the same savings without changing the look of photos so much. But that wouldn’t broadcast the goal of the design in the same way to readers. “We wanted to highlight this act of compression that’s something we don’t always think about when we’re surfing the web,” Otsuka explains.

The same logic led to the battery meter that accompanies the reader around the site. “It’s the most controversial part of the design–some people really hate it,” De Decker says. “But I think we’ll keep it, because it shows the reader that what you’re doing now consumes energy; depending on how many articles you read, it’s going to go down.”

The team estimates that the site will be offline about 35 days per year or about 10% of the time–another design feature that some critics, unsurprisingly, saw as a glitch. In fact, when commenters pointed out that it would be simple to use multiple servers to keep the site online on cloudy days, Roel Roscam Abbing, the Dutch artist who focused on the new site’s hardware, responded by explaining how the weather is fundamental to the design.

“We are aware that we could make multiple servers around the world to always have the sun shining and use clever routing to always have the machine online,” he wrote. “In the case of our server it is fairly simple to have a 90% uptime with a cheap and energy efficient computer and a small solar panel. However, to go above that 90% we would need to double or triple the machines used, the solar panels necessary and our storage capacity available. That is not even mentioning the resources necessary to maintain all of this in different parts of the world. If this is to work in a sustainable way, we have to change our attitude and the best way to do that in terms of web is to challenge the holy grail of ‘uptime.’”

Otsuka points to Jevons’ paradox, an economic theory that states that if you become more efficient at using a particular resource, you don’t end up using less of it. Instead, you use more–because of increased demand. In other words, the goal isn’t to make today’s typically heavy web design more efficient. It’s to reduce its energy consumption overall. Or, as Roscam Abbing puts it on the site’s open source guide to low-tech design, “Not in order to be able to ‘do more with the same,’ but rather ‘to do the same with less.’”

What makes the idea so powerful is that, by reducing the energy footprint of the site, the design also subtly improves the experience of the person reading it. Because it has no ads, relying instead on Patreon donors, the site has no cookies or third-party content to track visitors. It doesn’t profile readers. There are no pop-up boxes or dark patterns. Because it exists as a static site, each page downloads 10 times faster. The fact that it won’t be available sometimes forces readers to “plan” when they will access its content around the weather and the time of day, rather than deluging them with it at all hours.

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Credits : Lifehacker

 

Coding school App Academy has opened a free online interactive version of its 12-week curriculum. That’s a pretty good deal, since the Academy’s in-person classes in San Francisco and New York can cost as much as a semester in college. The online version involves less direct human interaction, but it includes online mentors and access to a community Slack chat.

At first glance, App Academy Open looks kind of like the popular free coding course Codecademy. An introductory course teaches basic coding concepts in a split-screen instruction interface and sandbox coding environment. Later lessons are structured as freeform assignments with text instructions, as the student works in their own development environment.

The major departure from Codecademy is in the curriculum. App Academy founder Kush Patel tells Lifehacker that while Codecademy is a good resource for all sorts of programming, App Academy Open is focused on “teaching folks web dev skills to get them a software engineering job.” (At the in-person school, tuition is tied to the student’s post-graduation salary.)

After an introduction to programming, an “alpha” course teaches concepts like arrays and debugging. The rest of the curriculum teaches the “full stack:” a course each in Ruby, SQL, Rails, Javascript, and React. Each course takes one or two weeks of full-time work.

The curriculum also covers a wide range of social issues in tech: outward-facing issues like algorithms that reinforce human bias and discrimination, and tech community issues like representation and exploitation of racial minorities, women, and LGBTQ people in the workplace. Rather than shunt these lessons into a separate module that students might ignore, App Academy laces them throughout its coding courses, presenting them as the essential career lessons that they are.

If you can commit to twelve weeks of challenging work without the pressure of tuition and in-person classes, then you’ll be getting thousands of dollars’ worth of practical coding education, built specifically to qualify you for a job in development, for free.

This article is shared by www.itechscripts.com | A leading resource of inspired clone scripts. It offers hundreds of popular scripts that are used by thousands of small and medium enterprises.

Credits : Techgenyz

 

Grabbing your target audience’s attention is not going to cut it anymore. With competition becoming stiffer with each passing day, you have got to keep them interested for long enough as all those websites hit to turn into conversions. Web developers have also got a crucial role to play when it comes to catching and keeping the user’s attention, and they can do the same using some smart tactics.

In keeping with the times, here are 9 trends in web development that every developer should watch out for, and ensure the implementation of the same for better conversion rates. Exceed your customers’ expectations by dishing out something extra, and these 9 web development trends can tell you the ways to do it!

1. Revamped landing pages

Landing pages have gone through an unending process of transformation. Moving past the text-heavy landing page formats, we have come to light landing pages that focus more on the information being readily accessible to the user. Since Internet users do not care to read even a third of what you write as content, it is best to keep the text to a bare minimum when it comes to designing your landing pages. Use riveting web design templates and features (and tonnes of CTAs) on your landing page to cater to the streamlined queries and problems of your users.

2. Age of static site generators

Dynamic site content can readily be turned into static ones using static site generators. This is the go-to tool for most bloggers of the modern age. It ensures keeping a low budget and enhanced site loading speed, making your content accessible to users. Security factors can also be taken care of using static site generators, and you can convert plain text into creative websites using these site generators. Web developers who like to work on light software that runs on all servers can heavily benefit from this trend for sure.

3. Featuring hero images and videos

Go to your browser and open the homepages of Samsung or Nike. The first thing that greets you is a big and bold image of happy faces featuring their products. Since human brains process visuals way faster than text, why not take advantage of the same and create your website around it? Using hero images that feature in the homepage section of your website is thus a trend that is here to stay. The same goes for big and bold geometric patterns and fonts. If you want an even better effect, go for a slideshow format and stuff up that homepage with three or more hero images! The same goes for videos too. Videos help engage audiences faster and a few seconds of captivating content is enough to keep them hooked to your website for long. As a web developer, you should keep this trend in mind the next time you meet with your team to discuss alterations you can bring to your website.

4. Chatbots and interactive UI to the fore

Live chats and chatbots are ringing in a new age in conversational UI. They make our lives way simpler and take care of auto-reply functions with ease. Incorporating the same for your website can be one of the best ways for you to ensure engagement and a better user experience. Virtual assistants help users to shop and assist them to choose from products and cater to their problems or queries, which is the next big things in web development. It also helps users overcome the barrier of having to go through complicated processes of navigating through your site by including a simple chatbot-powered interactive feature to your website.

5. The rise of the JavaScript

2017 was the year of JavaScript with brilliant frameworks, technologies, and libraries. Riding on the JavaScript wave this year comes to the fundamentals that web developers need to get to the bottom of. Functions of JavaScript like the Builtin method, Closures, ES6, Pure Functions, Callbacks, RAIL, Promises, and Node have got the web developers around the world sitting up and taking notice. Since JavaScript also has the REACT library for building user interfaces, it can be the go-to solution for every web developer worth his coding skills this year as well. Combine frameworks like Meteor with resources from the library, and you will pave your way to a better website interface in the future.

6. Going for minimalistic designs

White space and vibrant splashes of color here and there are aesthetically balanced to create the optimum comfort to the eyes. That is exactly how it goes when it comes to modern website design. Provide some respite for eyes exhausted from the endless scrolling throughout the day, and make sure that your website has a minimalist approach when it comes to material design. Less is more in the new age, and one look at Apple’s website will tell you that. Steer clear of elaborate designs and complicated vectors – just a simple icon or image of books to signify assignment help or a dialler icon for contact information would suffice.

7. Taking a mobile-first approach

Apps account for 89% of mobile media time in a day, with 11% spent on individual websites. Taking a mobile-first approach for designing your web development strategy is thus the smartest move you can make as a marketer. Keep in mind the various types of mobile interfaces when developing your website to ensure that it is suited for phones. Also, bring in a bunch of interactive material design changes when your website is viewed on a mobile device that provides a smoother and better user experience as compared to desktops or laptops.

8. Motion UI is here to stay

Create customized CSS transitions and animations using the motion UI features available on SaaS library. With a more updated version that lets you work on better transition options, animation queuing and flexible CSS patterns that work on any JS animation library, motion UI is the next big thing in web development for sure. Playing around with motion UI lets you explore the navigation features of a website when you are at a production environment and makes prototyping quite an easy breeze. With plenty of motion UI aspects in the current times, it is high time for you to ensure that your website features quite a copious amount of the same to make it more engaging for the users.

9. Keeping RAIL in focus for UX

Web developers of the modern age are no strangers to the RAIL strategy. It enables them to ensure a great user experience on the website. Amp up your RAIL strategy to develop a better perspective for the users and define UX based on your findings.

For the uninitiated, the RAIL acronym stands for Response, Animation, Idle and Load (the four primary functions that define UX at any website). Keeping RAIL in focus is essential as it contributes to all of the following.

  • RAIL chunks up UX into important actions for the users (tap, scroll, drag, and the likes)
  • RAIL offers specific goals for each of the critical actions taken by the user
  • RAIL can be a good place to start thinking about the performance factors for your website

Parting Words

Whether it is assisting users to shop online with just a live chat conversation with a chatbot or making websites way more engaging with loads of video content, keep the 9 brilliant web development trends in mind when developing your strategy for this year. Ensure smooth functioning of every feature in your website, catering to the mobile-only audience group, and make the all-around UX an enjoyable and efficient one. As a web developer of the modern age, that’s what you should be focusing on anyway. Since the industry keeps transforming itself with every new function added to a coding language or resource, brace yourself for the next major upheavals in web development. Till then, let these 9 web development strategies keep you busy!

 

This article is shared by www.itechscripts.com | A leading resource of inspired clone scripts. It offers hundreds of popular scripts that are used by thousands of small and medium enterprises.

Credits : Digitaltrends

 

Automatic over-the-air updates have been happening for years on laptops, phones, even TVs. But in the automotive industry it’s been relatively rare. Tesla was a significant exception.

Starting in the fall of 2012, the electric car company added features like the ability to save driver profile settings by name and a coast function that let the EV roll forward without having to put your foot on the accelerator. That same year, other automakers were testing the OTA airwaves.

Mercedes-Benz, for example, updated its Mbrace2 in-dash system in the SL roadster to accept OTA updates in 2012. Most of those updates were focused on non-critical infotainment features, like mirrored apps, but it was a significant step for the notoriously circumspect German car company. Others followed suit, even safety-conscious Volvo.

“We started in 2015 with the XC90,” explained Volvo’s Niclas Gyllenram, “and now we do it for all modes of the entertainment systems.”

Today, Ford, FCA (formally known as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles), and others perform over-the-air updates on a regular basis. Most, however, only have to do with non-essential systems, such as navigation map updates and sound system changes. In general, mainstream automakers have steered clear of updating safety systems or features directly related to driving. For the most part, they require owners to come in to the dealership and have a service technician perform any critical system software updates. And for good reason.

“Before cars were connected, they were basically air-gapped computers,” explained Dan Sahar of security firm Upstream. In other words, a lack of connectivity made it nearly impossible for hackers to attack a car. “But once cars became connected, the threat went from zero to 100,” he said.

Sahar and other security experts point to the infamous Jeep hack. In 2015, researchers showed how someone could track and hack a 2014 Jeep Cherokee thanks to security gaps in Sprint’s network and the on-board infotainment systems in the SUVs. Argus Cyber Security gave us a firsthand demonstration of the threat, turning the windshield wipers on and suddenly braking a Jeep while we were driving the SUV.

With such possible dangers, then, why are car companies pursuing OTA updates?

“It’s a definite benefit,” said Dean Martin of telematics company Harman. “Over-the-air updates can fix bugs, do recalls, and actually enhance security,” he explained.

Rather than having to return to the dealership every time a problem is detected, automakers can push OTA updates directly out to owners to perform fixes. That could improve safety. According to NHTSA, today only 62 percent of recalled cars ever get repaired–even after owners have been sent multiple notices. OTA could eliminate many of these compliance problems, and save millions of dollars in maintenance work in the process.

And anyone who has updated their car’s software using a USB stick knows it’s more like a conjurer’s trick: Open the driver’s door, turn off the ignition three times, and then turn on accessory mode to reboot the system. Not exactly intuitive. Over the air updates could obviate all that.

Gil Reiter, a vice president at SafeRide explained that being online also allows companies to “uncover unknown vulnerabilities and create updated policies to mitigate them, policies that are updated in the car over-the-air.”

“The key is being cloud-based” and that means being connected, emphasized Upstream’s Sahar. “You need to look for anomalies,” he said, and that includes monitoring back-end data center systems where a single hack could potentially lead to access to hundreds of thousands of cars.

Over-the-air updates can also be used to enable some remarkable improvements and changes in a vehicle, from making transmission adjustments to tweaking performance and fuel efficiency. They can even be used to adjust brake responsiveness, as Tesla demonstrated after reviewers at Consumer Reports complained about the poor stopping distances on the Model 3.

However, the level of complexity of such updates makes them trickier than simply updating an app on a smartphone.

“There are more than 100 million lines of code in a vehicle, so it’s a critical challenge to keep it up to date and safe,” said Zohar Fox, CEO of Aurora Labs.

So, it’s no surprise that automotive software changes can be fraught with complications, from safety to reliability concerns.

Engineers in charge of Buick’s powertrain explained, for example, that they can’t simply decide to change a transmission shift point on its SUVs without consulting with other engineers in charge of, say, meeting fuel efficiency standards. Then there are issues about how such a change could affect wear and tear on other parts, all the way down to the tires. So, months of testing may be needed before even a small software change can be transmitted to hundreds of thousands of cars.

And some over-the-air updates intended to steer clear of critical car systems have still done more harm than good.

Earlier this year, FCA sent out an OTA update for its Uconnect infotainment systems in 2017 and 2018 Jeep and Dodge Durango models. Some customers then discovered their in-dash units had gone into a vicious cycle of endless reboots, effectively disabling the entertainment system — as well as some emergency assistance services.

Back in 2016, Lexus effectively bricked the Enform infotainment systems in some of its models with an OTA update. And even Tesla has run into glitches with software updates delivered wirelessly.

Nevertheless, over-the-air updates are poised to become ubiquitous in new cars because the advantages outweigh the hazards.

“It will make people’s lives easier on the road, adding convenience and more functionality,” said Ky Tang, executive director of strategy at Telenav.

The company already provides connected infotainment and navigation services to automakers, and is working to offer additional services such as ordering and paying for fast food while you’re on the road so it’s ready to pick up when you arrive. Telenav is also working with parking companies so that, with connected services, drivers will be able to find (and pay for) available parking based on over-the-air updates without wasting time and gas searching for a spot. Such updates could in turn reduce traffic congestion and pollution.

And it’s not just live traffic and up-to-date maps that need to be sent to cars online, explained Tang. The cars themselves will become rolling sensors, sending camera, parking, and weather information back to the cloud to share with other vehicles.

Even conveniences like Amazon’s Alexa in the car, already offered to a degree on models ranging from BMW to Ford to Nissan, mean having a constant connection to the cloud — and enabling over-the-air changes. And, with the anticipated debut of autonomous cars in the future, OTA updates will be a necessity. After all, if you don’t want to be bothered driving the car, you’re not likely to want to waste time taking it in to the dealership for a fix, either.

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Credits : Hexus

 

AMD has issued a statement to say that it will be ceasing the development of drivers for 32-bit Windows systems. It says such support has been moved to ‘legacy support mode’ so future driver releases will be 64-bit only. AMD abandoned Windows 8.1 32-bit Radeon driver support back in Feb 2017 because “nobody cares,” but Nvidia beat it to the decision to cease developing 32-bit drivers entirely when it signalled the change back in December last year.

What AMD means by legacy support is that it won’t be providing any updated 32-bit Radeon Software unless some critical issues appear / are discovered in the existing drivers. Most new AAA games have moved to 64-bit only, with their spiralling RAM demands, so there shouldn’t be too many AMD gamers upset by the move as long as critical patches, to patch up security gaffes and similar, are still covered.

AMD’s full statement, made in response to enquiries by Japanese site 4Gamer, is reproduced below:

“AMD Radeon Software support for x32-bit Windows operating systems has been moved to a legacy support mode — we are not planning to support x32-bit Windows operating systems in future driver releases. This change enables AMD to dedicate valuable engineering resources to developing new features and enhancements for graphics products based on the latest x64-bit Windows based operating systems.

Users can continue to use existing x32-bit drivers if they so choose. However, for those who are passionate about gaming and want to continue receiving the best of Radeon Software features and performance, we recommend they consider upgrading to a x64-bit Windows operating system.”

4Gamer noted one further driver related news nugget. It relayed that the latest Radeon driver update now includes support for China-only SKUs such as the recently unearthed Radeon RX 580 2048SP, as well as the lesser-spotted RX 580G, and RX 570G.

AMD has traditionally pushed out a major driver software suite update towards the end of the year. The milestone Crimson ReLive release was followed up last year by the Adrenalin Edition, and we expect a similar revamp effort in the coming months – but it will eschew 32-bit users.

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Credits : Siliconrepublic

 

Plenty of companies are on the hunt for software developers. So, what are the secrets to software developer success?

If you want to be a software developer, you won’t be stuck for company choices. Many of the biggest companies are looking for software developers.

So, how exactly can you map out a successful career as a software developer? What do you need to know when you’re just starting out?

We gleaned a number of tips for someone who wants to be a software developer from those who have walked the path before.

1. Practice makes perfect

Ronan O’Dulaing is the vice-president of engineering at Globoforce. He said a passion for problem-solving is critical to a successful career in software development. “You could start by practising coding simple programs every day,” he said.

“Pick problems to solve, perhaps related to your home or your other hobbies, and use your chosen language (Java, C++, C#, JavaScript, Ruby, Python or Scala) to figure them out. There are lots of tutorials online to get you started.”

He also suggested attending meet-ups if you want to pursue a career. “They’ll give you a broad understanding on a range of technology topics, give you a great opportunity to speak to people [and] help you determine where to best employ the skills you’ve acquired.”

2. Learn the language

William Ho is an innovation software engineer at EY. He said someone at the very beginning of their career should try out and learn about as many different languages as they can, as having a niche skillset can limit future career prospects.

“In terms of languages, it all depends on your field of interest. If you were looking at web development, you might look at perhaps a .NET language or PHP; if it’s native mobile, it would be Android or Swift; object-oriented programming, it could be anything from Java, Python, Ruby to C++ etc,” he said.

“In terms of career prospects, having an understanding of a mixture of some of the above would put you in a very strong position.”

3. Make it work, make it correct, make it fast

As with every job, there’s a learning curve. As you progress, you will improve your skills. When it comes to software development, Zendesk developer Jose Narvaez said your goal should be to make it work, make it correct and make it fast – in that order.

“In other words, start with simple solutions, adding the edge cases after you prove the simpler solution works. Once you have confirmed the results are correct for all of your inputs, proceed to measure performance and, only then, optimise accordingly.”

4. Focus on the user’s needs

Deloitte’s Alan Jue Liu believes it is important for someone who wants to be a software developer to understand what software is there for. “It is to make people’s job easier, to allow people to do more,” he said.

“When designing software, tackle complexity by distillation and tackle simplicity by thinking holistically. Design better software by always focusing on the needs of your users who will use, maintain, deploy and interact with your software.”

5. Be aggressive in your development

When it comes to software development, upskilling, self-learning and personal development are major parts of your career. According to Donal Byrne, a software developer at Jaguar Land Rover, you need to be aggressive about your own learning.

“Getting good grades in a relevant degree isn’t enough. Go out and start building real pieces of software. Take what you have learned and apply it,” he said.

“Being able to do your own independent study/research and then implement it in a real project is by far the best way to improve and display your skills.”

6. Become an adaptable problem-solver

Steven O’Kennedy, a technology architecture lead in Accenture, said it’s important for a software developer to know that it’s not their job to write code, it’s their job to find answers to problems.

“As a developer, understanding when to use technologies or techniques, knowing which are best for what, and knowing what the trade-offs are will make you a better developer, more valuable to your team and more confident in your decisions,” he said.

“Don’t be a technology fundamentalist who always tries to fit the problem to the tool they know. Just because your favourite technology/technique can fix a problem does not mean that it’s the right one to use!”

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Credits : Appinventiv

 

Both PHP and ASP.NET has broad bases. They are used by huge number of developers and this makes it difficult for the new developers to choose either one of them. In one hand, PHP is a general scripting language on which developers rely to a great extent and on the other hand, ASP.NET has a brand like Microsoft attached to its name.

ASP.NET vs PHP is an argument that doesn’t seem to have an end any time soon. Since both are quite popular languages in the programming world. You must have seen a ton of articles on differences between ASP.NET and PHP by now but in reality most of those articles are biased.

However, in this article we will talk about both the programming languages, breakdown the terms in for better understanding and discuss which is better ASP.NET or PHP.

PHP

PHP is a recursive acronym for Hypertext Preprocessor. It is an open source programming language that is used for web development and can be embedded into HTML. The best thing about PHP framework is that it is great for beginners since it allows simple and easy coding techniques. On the other hand PHP is great for professional programmers as well because of all the advanced features it offers. PHP framework is said to be adopted by many businesses in the near future and you can look at the upcoming best php frameworks here.

Pros and Cons of PHP framework

Pros:

One of the biggest advantage that PHP has is the rapid development. The market demands faster app development process and PHP gives the benefit to any mobile app development company that does multiple productions in one day. The framework is not only fast but ensures the security of the application. But the PHP developers have to make sure to use the framework as it is meant to be used to ensure application’s security. PHP is easier to maintain and has a huge community of developers that provides help whenever needed.

Cons:

PHP is prefered by developers for all the advantages it provides but they can’t ignore the disadvantages that comes with it. Slower execution, lack of ability to solve specific problems and time taking to master are some of the cons of this framework.

ASP.NET

ASP.NET is an open-source server side web development tool developed by Microsoft. The framework provides web development tools to produce dynamic web pages, web applications and web solutions. ASP.NET frameworks are written in .NET language and support Visual Basic.NET, JavaScript.NET and languages like Python and Perl. The framework also compatible with the previous version ASP.NET MVC.

Pros and Cons of ASP.NET frameworks

Pros

The pros of using ASP.NET include the flexibility to add and remove features as and when needed, the ease of setting up, a cross-platform and open-source framework and compatibility with  other .NET frameworks. Microsoft has claimed it to be a highly popular framework soon just like Ruby and Node.js.

Cons

However, ASP.NET does have a few cons that may make its popularity a slow process. The framework does have problems when it comes to ease of making changes, documentation gaps, lack of supporting tools and lack of basic features since its too raw. These issues can be solved by ASP.NET developers, of course, by using external tools and methods.

ASP.NET vs PHP: The comparison

There is no doubt that both ASP.NET and PHP frameworks are great frameworks to work with but one may have few advantages more than the other. For professional developers this debate has already been settled based on their experience with each of the frameworks. But any budding developer might want to take a look at this comparison to decide which platform to start with.

Both PHP and ASP.NET provide multiple advantages and at the same time has some disadvantages. To decide which one is better than the other, we shall compare each of these two carefully. In this section we will discuss ASP.NET vs PHP: Which is better?

Performance

When it comes to the performance of a framework there is a misconception that the language of the framework determines its performance. However, this is not completely true. The performance of any framework depends on the way the coding was done.

The performance of ASP.NET is comparatively better than that of PHP. This statement may not be believed by PHP developers for the fact that many great websites have been built using PHP.

While that may be true but it does not dismiss the fact that ASP.NET allows parallel programming which lets chunks of code to run all at the same time whereas PHP does not support threading at all.

Market Share

The biggest difference between ASP.NET and PHP is the usage and market share. The chart below clearly shows that PHP has more usage popularity than ASP.NET. The websites built with PHP has been ranked among the Top 10k sites, Top 100k sites and Top 1M sites. Whereas ASP.NET hasn’t been awarded any titles that can beat PHP’s.

Awards of PHP and .NET

 

Security

Another huge difference between ASP.NET and PHP is the security options they both provide. Both the platforms provide security features to the developers however ASP.NET has built in security features such as SQL injection. In other words, ASP.NET automatically does the work for you whereas PHP only provides you with the tools.

Security with ASP.NET and PHP

So to settle which is better ASP.NET or PHP security-wise, ASP.NET would be the right choice. The PHP developers are provided with the tool and if they wish they can structure their apps securely. Sadly, many PHP developers don’t care about it and that results in vulnerable apps.

Websites

Since it has been said earlier in the article that websites that used PHP has been ranked top as compared to ASP.NET built websites here are two lists to compare ASP.NET vs PHP websites:

Websites built using PHP

  • Facebook
  • Wikipedia
  • WordPress.com
  • Flickr
  • Yahoo!
  • iStockPhoto
  • Tumblr
  • Mailchimp

Websites built using ASP.NET

  • StackOverflow
  • Microsoft
  • GoDaddy
  • DELL
  • Visual Studio
  • Wild Tangent
  • Diply.com
  • TacoBell.com

Among these, some websites are extremely popular in both the lists but the majority of famous websites are PHP developed.

Cost-wise which is better, ASP.NET or PHP?

In this area, PHP is a clear winner for the reason that PHP is an open source development framework whereas ASP.NET charges some fee for hosting. The fee charged by Microsoft owned ASP.NET is not high but when compared to PHP’s free usage, it can make developers skeptical towards ASP.NET.

The cost does not however stop ASP.NET developers from building websites using the framework. Another great way is to outsource the ASP.NET mobile app development services.

Community Support: ASP.NET vs PHP

It’s a given that PHP has a larger community than ASP.NET because it’s free. But that is not the only thing to say about a good community. ASP.NET community consists of highly dedicated developers who are supportive of their community even though the numbers is not as high as PHP. Of course the PHP community regularly comes up with the solutions to the challenges faced during PHP web apps development process.

However, advantage of ASP.NET over PHP is that the ASP.NET developers have a community that is rather dedicated towards programming that having a large support.

[Also read: Node.js vs PHP: Which is the Best Server Side Environment ]

Advantages of ASP.NET over PHP

All the comparisons in the previous section point towards choosing PHP over ASP.NET. But this may seem unfair to those who are looking for reasons to choose ASP.NET over PHP. So what is the use of ASP.NET?

PHP vs .NET Which technology has more scope

 

  • ASP.NET provides the freedom to choose from multiple languages such as C#, Visual Basic.NET, C++, etc.
  • The SQL security feature that ASP.NET provides is automatically applied to the applications and has unlimited data storage.
  • With ASP.NET you get multiple .NET libraries which is not the case in PHP development.
  • ASP.NET allows threading of codes which allows multiple codes to run at the same time.
  • ASP.NET developers are paid much better than any PHP developer because of there are less ASP.NET developers in the market.

[See: How to Hire a Top Rated Mobile App Developer? {8 Easy Steps} ]

As this debate of ASP.NET vs PHP comes to an end its time to decide which one is better than the other. Both the development frameworks are exceptionally great in the work they do and developers freely choose between them as per the need of the development process.

In many cases PHP has proved to be a stronger framework but has also had some weaknesses that can affect the development process to a great extent. We have also seen a completely separate section for the advantages in ASP.NET development which consisted of strong points of benefits for the developers.

PHP has a huge community and is a free framework to work with. On the other hand ASP.NET is likely to have more scope in the future since it has a huge company name Microsoft behind it.

But if you still can’t decide between the two, contact our team at Appinventiv and we will help you out. We engage in both ASP.NET web app development and PHP mobile app development services which will help us give you the best solution for your problems. Take a look at our mobile app development guide for more information.

This article is shared by www.itechscripts.com | A leading resource of inspired clone scripts. It offers hundreds of popular scripts that are used by thousands of small and medium enterprises.

Credits : Techaeris

 

Web development services are becoming more crucial with each passing day. Simple site builders can provide some semblance of a digital presence albeit a temporary one. A higher level of site quality is becoming a deciding factor that can make or break businesses. Just having a one-pagesite with a phone number and brief description simply won’t work anymore for most businesses.

The name of the game is building out the best site possible for the best price possible. Using web development services are one option for those that don’t possess the technical talent nor patience to realize their ideas within a reasonable amount of time.

Web development services are becoming more crucial with each passing day. Simple site builders can provide some semblance of a digital presence albeit a temporary one. A higher level of site quality is becoming a deciding factor that can make or break businesses. Just having a one-pagesite with a phone number and brief description simply won’t work anymore for most businesses.

The name of the game is building out the best site possible for the best price possible. Using web development services are one option for those that don’t possess the technical talent nor patience to realize their ideas within a reasonable amount of time.

But, beyond just building a company website, what are ways that web development services can be used by both seasoned and aspiring entrepreneurs?

  • As part of a greater range of services.
  • To help flesh out lead generating sites.
  • To help improve conversion rates on a previous site setup.

One way that many businesses are able to bolster their profits is by giving referrals for contracts or projects to web development teams from their current client base. Many businesses from law to banking come in contact with a range of business owners and individuals that will at some point in the next six months to a year need to work with a web developer.

Playing the role of matchmaker can go a long way to both pad your wallet, as well as your reputation for being a problem solver.

Web development services are becoming more crucial with each passing day. Simple site builders can provide some semblance of a digital presence albeit a temporary one. A higher level of site quality is becoming a deciding factor that can make or break businesses. Just having a one-pagesite with a phone number and brief description simply won’t work anymore for most businesses.

The name of the game is building out the best site possible for the best price possible. Using web development services are one option for those that don’t possess the technical talent nor patience to realize their ideas within a reasonable amount of time.

But, beyond just building a company website, what are ways that web development services can be used by both seasoned and aspiring entrepreneurs?

  • As part of a greater range of services.
  • To help flesh out lead generating sites.
  • To help improve conversion rates on a previous site setup.

One way that many businesses are able to bolster their profits is by giving referrals for contracts or projects to web development teams from their current client base. Many businesses from law to banking come in contact with a range of business owners and individuals that will at some point in the next six months to a year need to work with a web developer.

Playing the role of matchmaker can go a long way to both pad your wallet, as well as your reputation for being a problem solver.

Another way business owners can make the most out of web development services is by going beyond the normal level that many businesses pursue by creating feeder or lead generation sites. These sites, when paired with a PPC or pay per click campaign, can work well to drum up opportunities for new sales depending on the industry.

Lead generation sites are interesting because they can be as in depth or as succinct as needed.

Some use them to increase their overall social media presence and feed users into related pages that can be used to drive long term traffic to the main site, or they can be just submit form landing pages. In either case, working with a web development service can help make it as painless and quick as possible to get them thrown up and altered as needed.

That said, to really maximize your funds when working with a web development service, it’s always great to start by showing them templates that are similar to what you are interested in structurally or functionally for what your team is trying to accomplish with whatever web property they are working on.

It will save money by not requiring them to build everything up from scratch unless what you need is an entirely custom solution. Though, in many cases, they can sample pieces of code for your projects and customize them to whatever you need.

This article is shared by www.itechscripts.com | A leading resource of inspired clone scripts. It offers hundreds of popular scripts that are used by thousands of small and medium enterprises.

Credits : Jpl.nasa

 

A mixed-reality software that allows scientists and engineers to virtually walk on Mars recently received NASA’s 2018 Software of the Year Award.

OnSight uses imagery from NASA’s Curiosity rover to create an immersive 3D terrain model, allowing users to wander the actual dunes and valleys explored by the robot. The goal of the software, a collaboration between Microsoft and JPL’s Ops Lab, is to bring scientists closer to the experience of being in the field. Unlike geologists on Earth, who can get up close and personal with the terrain they study, Martian geologists have a harder time visualizing their environment through 2D imagery from Mars.

“Feeling like you’re standing on Mars really gives you a different sense of Mars than just looking at the pictures,” said Parker Abercrombie, OnSight team lead. “And I think it’s a really powerful way to bring people to these places that they physically can’t visit.”

“Being able to visualize Curiosity’s drives and virtually walk them before we actually do it with the rover is really helpful to give me a sense of how safe or challenging the terrain will be,” said Abigail Fraeman, a member of Curiosity’s science team.

In addition to studying the geology of Mars, the software allows scientists at any location to “meet” on Mars with avatars that can walk, point and interact with one another.

These virtual field trips help the science team study Martian geology using Curiosity data in a collaborative setting. In the future, OnSight will be adapted for the Mars 2020 rover and could be applied to other extreme environments that are difficult to visit.

“I feel like OnSight has evolved into all these different subpaths,” said Alice Winter, a user-experience researcher for OnSight. “It’s about the scientists, but it’s also about making the platform something that everyone can access.”

The team is working to make a version of the software available to the public. An exhibit highlighting the OnSight experience, “Destination: Mars,” had a limited run at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center in 2016. “Access Mars,” a Google collaboration built on WebVR, was released on 2017 and runs on a desktop browser.

NASA’s Software of the Year of the Year Award honors the best software developed at NASA. “We are honored to receive this recognition and grateful for the investment that the institution has made in supporting this emerging technology,” said Abercrombie.

The following teams were selected for honorable mention:

  • Ames Research Center: NASA Task Load Index (TLX) iOS
  • Glenn Research Center: LEWICE3D
  • Goddard Space Flight Center: NASA Worldview and Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS)
  • Langley Research Center: Assured Geo-Containment for Unmanned Aircraft
  • Johnson Space Center:JSC’s General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS)

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Credits : Fastcompany

 

The internet is a system that demands more: more engagement, more clicks, more ads, more content, more code, more servers, and more devices. The size of a typical web page has increased exponentially in recent years. Thirty-nine percent of young Americans report they are online “almost constantly.” Today almost 20% of American households contain more than 10 internet-connected devices, which have their own associated energy costs. By 2025, the internet will account for 20% of the energy consumed on the planet.

Last month, Low-Tech Magazine quietly published a completely redesigned site for its technology- and energy-focused journalism that looks radical by comparison. The premise is simple: Less.

Unlike millions of other dynamic sites on the internet today that retrieve each piece of content from a database any time someone visits, Low-Tech’s solar-powered site is simply static documents stored on a single, self-hosted server.

That server is powered by a small photovoltaic array on founder Kris De Decker’s balcony in Barcelona, which keeps the site online when it’s sunny. If it’s cloudy for more than a day or two, Low-Tech goes offline. A battery icon on each article shows how much juice the server has left and the forecast (sunny and 83%, at the moment).

There are no ads or pop-up dialogs, and images are compressed to a bare minimum. The logo is a unicode symbol and the typeface is your browser default, which means your computer doesn’t have to query a server. All in all, the average page size is five times smaller than the old site.It’s a radical departure from the digital design of today, where more videos and dynamic features have made web pages heavier and heavier. But the new site isn’t a Ludditical argument for the return of 1990s-era internet. It’s more like a reminder that our internet has weight–and everyone, from developers and designers to writers and readers–contributes to it.

“We used to [only] be online when we were at a desktop computer with an internet connection,” De Decker says. “But now this limitation is gone, so we’re online from the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep.”

Have you ever thought about how much energy it takes to refresh your Instagram while you’re lying in bed? Be honest. The premise of Low-Tech’s redesign is simple: We should be thinking about it.

The new site is the result of two summers of collaboration with artist Roel Roscam Abbing and designers Marie Otsuka. and Lauren Traugott-Campbell, who received a grant while at RISD to work with De Decker on developing a low-energy platform and content management system for the magazine. Otsuka, now graduated and working as a type designer, wanted the the site to expose its own infrastructure.

“This approach is very specific to Low-Tech, but I do think it’s really important to understand all the parts that go into a website–in addition to the look and feel on the front-end, the infrastructure on the back-end,” she explains. “What the design is aiming to do is show that relationship, and have the infrastructure of the website also be part of the content of the website.”

For instance, they decided to compress every image on the site with dithering, a long-outdated form of compression that was popular in the 1990s:

Dithering makes images 10 times less resource-intensive–but that’s not the only reason they chose it. When the magazine relaunched, commenters pointed out that newer types of image compression could’ve achieved the same savings without changing the look of photos so much. But that wouldn’t broadcast the goal of the design in the same way to readers. “We wanted to highlight this act of compression that’s something we don’t always think about when we’re surfing the web,” Otsuka explains.

The same logic led to the battery meter that accompanies the reader around the site. “It’s the most controversial part of the design–some people really hate it,” De Decker says. “But I think we’ll keep it, because it shows the reader that what you’re doing now consumes energy; depending on how many articles you read, it’s going to go down.”

The team estimates that the site will be offline about 35 days per year or about 10% of the time–another design feature that some critics, unsurprisingly, saw as a glitch. In fact, when commenters pointed out that it would be simple to use multiple servers to keep the site online on cloudy days, Roel Roscam Abbing, the Dutch artist who focused on the new site’s hardware, responded by explaining how the weather is fundamental to the design.

“We are aware that we could make multiple servers around the world to always have the sun shining and use clever routing to always have the machine online,” he wrote. “In the case of our server it is fairly simple to have a 90% uptime with a cheap and energy efficient computer and a small solar panel. However, to go above that 90% we would need to double or triple the machines used, the solar panels necessary and our storage capacity available. That is not even mentioning the resources necessary to maintain all of this in different parts of the world. If this is to work in a sustainable way, we have to change our attitude and the best way to do that in terms of web is to challenge the holy grail of ‘uptime.’”

The team estimates that the site will be offline about 35 days per year or about 10% of the time–another design feature that some critics, unsurprisingly, saw as a glitch. In fact, when commenters pointed out that it would be simple to use multiple servers to keep the site online on cloudy days, Roel Roscam Abbing, the Dutch artist who focused on the new site’s hardware, responded by explaining how the weather is fundamental to the design.

“We are aware that we could make multiple servers around the world to always have the sun shining and use clever routing to always have the machine online,” he wrote. “In the case of our server it is fairly simple to have a 90% uptime with a cheap and energy efficient computer and a small solar panel. However, to go above that 90% we would need to double or triple the machines used, the solar panels necessary and our storage capacity available. That is not even mentioning the resources necessary to maintain all of this in different parts of the world. If this is to work in a sustainable way, we have to change our attitude and the best way to do that in terms of web is to challenge the holy grail of ‘uptime.’”

Otsuka points to Jevons’ paradox, an economic theory that states that if you become more efficient at using a particular resource, you don’t end up using less of it. Instead, you use more–because of increased demand. In other words, the goal isn’t to make today’s typically heavy web design more efficient. It’s to reduce its energy consumption overall. Or, as Roscam Abbing puts it on the site’s open source guide to low-tech design, “Not in order to be able to ‘do more with the same,’ but rather ‘to do the same with less.’”

What makes the idea so powerful is that, by reducing the energy footprint of the site, the design also subtly improves the experience of the person reading it. Because it has no ads, relying instead on Patreon donors, the site has no cookies or third-party content to track visitors. It doesn’t profile readers. There are no pop-up boxes or dark patterns. Because it exists as a static site, each page downloads 10 times faster. The fact that it won’t be available sometimes forces readers to “plan” when they will access its content around the weather and the time of day, rather than deluging them with it at all hours.

The design nudges readers to consume less energy, which means altering our behavior and being a little more thoughtful about the information we consume. It makes the internet feel like a finite resource: Rather than begging us to click, it asks us to only click when we need to. Do you really need that extra tab?

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